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Sam Worthington Still Interested In ‘Battle Of Long Tan’ Role


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#1 BethmooraRaven

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Posted 29 September 2011 - 07:14 PM

EncoreMagazine.com.au have posted a nice article on the ‘Battle Of Long Tan’ movie that is currently in pre-production. Sam did the narration for the Red Dune Films documentary and is still very interested in a lead role in the movie.


Battle of Long Tan producer takes new direction with script…

The producer of the long term film project The Battle Of Long Tan has brought in a new team for a restructure of the script originally drafted by veteran director Bruce Beresford.

Martin Walsh said that he had approached The Story Shop trio of James Nicholas, Paul Sullivan and Karel Segers to develop a new approach to telling the story of the Vietnam battle and the Australian soldiers involved.

Walsh, who is producing the film through his production company Red Dune Films, is aiming to raise a budget of $15m. Walsh told Encore that Beresford – whose direction credits include Driving Miss Daisy, Breaker Morant, Mao’s Last Dancer and currently The White Mouse may yet direct. He said: “We talk all the time.”

Actor Sam Worthington – who narrated Walsh’s 2006 documentary on the Battle of Long Tan – remains interested in the lead role, said Walsh.

The rewrite by The Story Shop has tightened the story around what will still be an ensemble action film. In the Battle of Long Tan 108 Australian and Kiwi soldiers did battle with up to 2,500 Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army.

Walsh said: “We now have a story stream that coherently anchors the myriad of twists and turns of an historic military encounter; one that still resonates 45 years after it happened.”

Walsh – himself a former special forces soldier – purchased the rights to the story written by one of the soldiers in the battle back in 2004.

As part of the process, he is now looking for an up and coming script writer ready to join the project as a “professional internship.”

He said: “The structure of the narrative, buoyed by the original script from Bruce, is now ready for a final burst of inspirational writing to take the project to the next stage of financing.”

James Nicholas, creative director of The Story Shop, said: “We are thrilled to be given not only a great cinematic true story but an opportunity to show the world one of the seminal moments of Australian military courage and achievement.

Most importantly we are writing a story that will entertain today’s audiences.”

Much of the filming is likely to take place in Far North Queensland. Walsh is seeking funding from Screen Australia, Screen Queensland and Screen NSW, as pre and post production is likely to take place there. He is also aiming for private funding.

He said: “I am hopeful we will have this draft within eight to ten weeks. That will be more than enough for the funding process.”

Visit the Battle Of Long Tan Facebook page to keep up with the production.



#2 *I See You*

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 05:38 PM

Communists Wrong on Long Tan History

July 27, 2012I have had more mail on the Long Tan casualty debate. This time from Martin Walsh of Red Dune films.


David,
I read your article ‘Long Tan casualty figures questioned’ in the Canberra Times.
Ernie Chamberlain is flat out wrong. I did all the research for our Battle of Long Tan documentary narrated by Sam Worthington, co-wrote the script and produced it and I’ve also continued to research Long Tan for our upcoming feature film. In 2006 I tracked down and interviewed former D445 commanders and other Long Tan Vietnamese veterans in Vietnam and we were also present when they were interviewed for the 60 Minutes story.


The Australian mercenaries, who are no less husky and beefy than their allies, the US aggressors, have proved as good fresh targets for the South Vietnam Liberation Fighters. In two days ending 18 August, the LAF wiped out 500 Australians mercenaries in Baria Province. The LAF (Liberation Armed Forces) shot down one of the US aircraft which went to the aid of the Australians. In this battle the LAF put out of action (killed) 400 Australian mercenaries, thus annihilating two full size companies, heavily decimated another, set afire three M113 armoured cars, downed one US jet fighter and captured a large quantity of arms and munitions. The day before, 17 August, the LAF in the same province wiped out 100 Australian mercenaries. (A Communist account)

· Battle of Long Tan documentary -
· 60 Minutes ‘Forgotten Heroes’ -

When I first negotiated through the Australian Consul General, Australian Ambassador and the Australian Military Attaché in Vietnam for permission to film there, the Vietnamese Government gave me specific names of those who they claimed had led the battle, for interview. By chance I had been in contact with an Australian who owned a pub in Vung Tau and who was married to a Vietnamese lady. Her uncle was Viet Cong and when I gave her the names given to me by the Vietnamese Government she later came back and said that they were not Long Tan veterans or commanders and only one was correct and he was the D445 Political Officer.

There still seemed a strong reluctance for the truth to come out at that time and the diaries and historical documents which Ernie Chamberlain has used for his book are all fictitious and distorted views of history but with some truth rolled in. Even when you visit the military museum at Bien Hoa in Vietnam which holds the original Long Tan cross you will see a highly distorted view of historical events.

When I first asked Dave Sabben and Bob Buick to go to Long Tan for the 60 Minutes story they said no way. The Long Tan veterans said, ``how do we go and have a conversation with someone who believes in a lie?'' The Vietnamese claimed they won the battle and this is their official view of it:
“The Australian mercenaries, who are no less husky and beefy than their allies, the US aggressors, have proved as good fresh targets for the South Vietnam Liberation Fighters. In two days ending 18 August, the LAF wiped out 500 Australians mercenaries in Baria Province. The LAF (Liberation Armed Forces) shot down one of the US aircraft which went to the aid of the Australians. In this battle the LAF put out of action (killed) 400 Australian mercenaries, thus annihilating two full size companies, heavily decimated another, set afire three M113 armoured cars, downed one US jet fighter and captured a large quantity of arms and munitions. The day before, 17 August, the LAF in the same province wiped out 100 Australian mercenaries.”

After many months of slowly building and cultivating a relationship with the Vietnamese Ministry of Foreign Affairs and their Foreign Press Centre and eventually when I was there in person, I convinced them that we were not going to demonise them in the documentary or in any media associated with it.

Even when we filmed the documentary in Vietnam we had at least six members of their Politburo with us at all times. They wrote down everything we said and what their veterans said but they never stopped us or them. We were petrified that they would simply confiscate our film when we were leaving the country!

It was only by chance because of Peter Harvey’s question in the 60 Minutes story that we have on record the former D445 commanders admitting for the first time that the Australian’s won the battle.

Anyway, these are the enemy units who fought in the Battle of Long Tan:

275 Regiment (NVA and VC) - Total 2,650+ men
· 1,600 soldiers from Viet Cong, 275 Main Force Regiment
· 500 soldiers from North Vietnamese Army, 45 Regiment
· 550 soldiers from the Viet Cong, D445 Battalion
It is also important to note that 274 Regiment comprising some 2,500 men was to the West of Nui Dat in a position (by all reports) to ambush any allied reinforcements from Saigon which would come down when 275 Regiment attacked Nui Dat. Their original plan was to attack Nui Dat but that was thwarted when they ran into D Coy, 6RAR in the Long Tan rubber plantation.
Here just a few of the facts and official documents I have collated and made available including official after actions reports, commanders diaries etc http://battleoflongt...long-tan-facts/

In terms of enemy dead, the official Australian body count was 245 dead. However, this figure is widely known by the veterans who were there and credible historians to be understated. On the 19 August as soldiers including the survivors of D Coy, 6RAR continued to search and count the bodies and enemy weapons and ammunition as well as bury the dead, a time deadline for the body count was given as 15.00 hours to enable the figure to be sent to Canberra. (After 17 Australians being killed in a single battle there was huge pressure on the military and the government from the press and the public.) By 20 August, 245 enemy were counted and this figure has gone into the records as the official number of enemy killed in the battle. However, scores of other bodies were found later – where the artillery had fallen on them in the assembly areas or reserve positions and in graves.
Many other parts of the rubber plantation and fields showed obvious signs of having been cleared: bloody patches, bandages, clothes, equipment, webbing and pieces of bodies. Only three enemy wounded (2 x NVA and 1 x D445 VC) were found and captured. This small number attests to the conscientiousness of the enemy evacuation teams. It was well known throughout the entire Vietnam War that the Vietnamese would carry away the majority of their dead so the allies could never deduce the extent of enemy losses.

If 245+ bodies were left on the battlefield, one can only imagine how many were carried away. All of this evidence points squarely at an enemy death toll far greater than the artificial, official figure of 245 enemy dead.
Australia has not and did not have a history of inflating enemy body counts in Vietnam.

Yours sincerely,

Martin Walsh, producer Red Dune Films
www.reddunefilms.com

Read more: http://www.canberrat...l#ixzz23M1gbGxf


#3 cate

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 06:32 PM

Fantastic find! Thank you for posting this.

#4 *I See You*

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 07:28 PM

Fantastic find! Thank you for posting this.


Glad you liked it. I find this project very interesting, too. :)





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